Invisalign invisible orthodontics

Orthodontics for children

Orthodontics for adults

Orthodontics for teens

Invisalign Invisible Orthodontics

  • Faster treatment
  • No metal; no visible braces
  • No food restrictions
  • More precise tooth movement
  • iTero digital impressions without any pain or discomfort

Learn about Invisalign ortodontics

Request a consultation 450 233-4900

News

Watch the orthodontics video Ça vaut le coût, presented on Télé Québec.

Watch the video here.

Since 2014

A proud donor to Smile for a Lifetime

Smile for a Lifetime Foundation is a charitable non-profit organization that each year provides free orthodontic care to hundreds of children with a significant need for such care but who do not have access to it due to financial difficulties and/or special situations.

VISIT TE WEBSITE

Orthodontics Guided Tour

  • What is an orthodontist?

    An orthodontist is a specialist in orthodontics, that is, the branch of dentistry that deals with the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of misaligned teeth and jaws. After graduating from dentistry and receiving the title of dentist, he or she must complete an additional full-time university course in an accredited orthodontics specialty program. This additional training provided by qualified specialists is for a period of two to three years, which means that an orthodontist has more extensive education in orthodontics than a general dentist.

  • Why is orthodontic treatment important?

    Orthodontic treatment gives you a beautiful smile, but it is important to realize that the primary goal of orthodontics is to improve oral health by correcting malocclusions (tooth and/or jaw misalignment). In fact, overlapping teeth are difficult to clean, which can contribute not only to the development of cavities, but also gum disease and, in some severe cases, tooth loss. Misaligned teeth that do not fit properly together can also cause chewing and speech problems, as well as excessive tooth wear and worsening of jaw pain. In addition, the benefits of a healthy smile for self-esteem at any age should not be underestimated!

    In short, healthy teeth definitely contribute to a beautiful appearance, but also plays a key role in the individual’s health and well-being. In addition, it must be kept in mind that additional dental care costs to correct problems caused by untreated malocclusion may exceed the cost of orthodontic treatment.

  • At what age should I bring my child in for a consultation?

    The American Association of Orthodontists recommends an initial consultation at the age of 7. It is always preferable to schedule a consultation sooner than later, as it can mean the difference between an effective treatment and a long, complicated and expensive treatment. In addition, orthodontic problems requiring early treatment are not always easy to notice. Parents should therefore not rely on their own or other’s assessment to determine whether an orthodontic consultation is necessary.

    It is important to note that even if a child receives a consultation at a fairly young age, this does not necessarily mean that an initial phase of early treatment will be undertaken. In fact, in many cases, only periodic follow-ups and simple preventive procedures will be necessary until the child is 12-14 years old. At this time, effective general orthodontic treatment can be begun. Through prevention, no treatment may be necessary in some cases.

  • Is orthodontic treatment possible for adults?

    Orthodontic treatment can be done at any age. Today, adults account for about 30% of patients receiving orthodontic treatment. Although the stopping of the growth of the face and jaws restricts the orthodontic options, tooth movement is the same in adults and children. Prospects for improvement depend on the health of the teeth and their supporting structure, among other things. Overlap or space between certain teeth, prominence of anterior teeth, shifting of a tooth in an adjacent space, and teeth that, for whatever reason, are in an abnormal position are all problems that can be improved through orthodontic treatment.

  • Do I have to be referred by a dentist?

    You can make an appointment at our clinic without being referred. If you have concerns about the position of your teeth or how they close together, you may decide to consult an orthodontist directly or discuss it with your general dentist, who may recommend that you consult a specialist in orthodontics.

  • How long will the treatment take?

    The duration of orthodontic treatment varies from person to person, since no one has exactly the same malocclusion (problem with the teeth and/or jaw positioning). Four main factors influence the duration of treatment: the type of malocclusion; its severity; the growth of the jaws and face; and, lastly, the patient’s cooperation during the treatment. That said, braces or other corrective devices are normally worn for a period of 18-30 months. The duration may be even less in simpler cases.

    With children, treatment is sometimes carried out in two stages. The initial stage, when the child is young (around the age of 7-9 years), takes advantage of the growth of the jaws and face to correct some specific problems and prevent the condition from worsening. The second stage, which generally begins after the eruption of all the permanent teeth (around the age of 12-14 years), completes the correction of the malocclusion.

  • What is the cost of treatment?

    The cost of orthodontic treatment varies greatly depending on the severity of the problem, the type of appliances used and the time required to complete the treatment. It is therefore impossible to establish a typical cost.

    To make treatment accessible, financing plans, such as spreading interest-free payments, are offered during a consultation. With the help of your insurance claims and tax rebates, treatment costs may be less than you might think! Also, remember that dental expenses that may be required to correct the adverse effects of untreated malocclusion may exceed the cost of orthodontic treatment. When assessing the cost of your treatment, consider the benefits of having a healthy smile for the rest of your life.

  • How does the treatment work?

    The orthodontic treatment works by positively affecting facial growth and by moving teeth so they can better position themselves. In some cases, when the jaw space is insufficient to align all the teeth, extraction of one or several teeth may be necessary. Also, in cases where severe jaw misalignment is present and the facial appearance is affected, orthodontic treatment may be combined with orthognathic surgery, that is, surgery to reposition the jaw.

    The type of appliance used to correct malocclusion depends on the problem to be treated and the patient’s preferences. Braces are still the most frequently used devices, but many other treatment options also exist today. After the orthodontic treatment, fixed or removable retainers must be worn in order to keep teeth from shifting away from their new position.

  • Is it painful?

    Technological advances made in recent decades have greatly reduced the discomfort associated with orthodontic treatment. Among other things, the brackets that are bonded to the teeth are much smaller and rounded, and the wires that are now used to align the teeth exert softer pressure to move the teeth, thus minimizing teeth sensitivity. Most patients adapt quickly to their treatment, which involves little discomfort.

  • How important is cooperation?

    Teamwork is the key to success in orthodontics. Successful treatment depends largely on the willingness and cooperation of the individual receiving the care. Excellent results within a short period of time can be achieved with impeccable oral hygiene, excellent cooperation with different devices and elastics, special attention to diet, and regular visits to the orthodontist and dentist.

  • Where do dental and facial problems come from?

    Most malocclusions, that is, misaligned teeth and/or jaws, are largely hereditary. This is particularly true in the case of tooth overlapping or spacing and jaw misalignment, such as a retrusive lower jaw and a receding chin. However, some malocclusions are acquired, such as problems caused by thumb sucking, continuously pushing the tongue on teeth, facial trauma, and premature tooth loss. These problems affect not only tooth and jaw alignment, but also the individual’s physical appearance, chewing and speech.

Ask a question to the orthodontist

  • What is an orthodontist?
  • Why is orthodontic treatment important?
  • At what age should I bring my child in for a consultation?
  • Is orthodontic treatment possible for adults?
  • Do I have to be referred by a dentist?
  • How long will the treatment take?
  • What is the cost of treatment?
  • How does the treatment work?
  • Is it painful?
  • How important is cooperation?
  • Where do dental and facial problems come from?